Digital.Complex: [done] vintage Radio Shack Aftershock - Digital.Complex

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[done] vintage Radio Shack Aftershock not the Losi one

#1 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 03:57 PM

Our very own Bryce_P found some RC's back at his home in Kona, and brought them back for me to check out. One of them still works (a Radio Shack buggy-type thing) while the other unfortunately stopped working. From what I can tell, it's called the Aftershock (no relation to the relatively recent Losi Aftershock) and it is pretty cool for being only $100.

Since the electronics died, Bryce_P consented to me retrofitting in hobby-grade parts to get it running again. Here's the results of four hours work:

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there's the Aftershock sticker

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front view

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side view. Unfortunately, despite its huge body-wheel clearance, the chassis is actually quite low and the suspension travel is limited.

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popping off the body made me appreciate modern body post technology. this one required four easily-stripped screws to be removed

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a shitty picture of the circuit board

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the components side of the circuit board

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interestingly, the radio required a separate 9v battery connection

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I was wondering what this mess was, when I realized that the heatshrink-wrapped thing is a thermistor. coupled with the relay visible a few photos back, that was the overheat protection

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power wires desoldered

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result on chassis

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circuit board removed

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the bottom of the chassis. I pulled out the Tamiya-style battery connector as well.

Unfortunately for the modern components I have, Radio Shack designed the battery compartment to be form-fitting to the nickel "shotgun" battery packs. This actually is pretty smart, and luckily Bryce_P had several NiCds laying around from when he bought this RC. Thankfully NiCds are indestructible, and every battery that I tried charging accepted (and held!) charge.

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somewhat false advertising considering the temperature cutoff is based on the ESC's MOSFET temp and not the motor's, but try explaining that to the general public without confusing them

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in modern times the Tx voltage had to come up (12v) before coming down (6v). The Rx went down (5v), and then has to come back up (8v) due to the HV servos used these days. Interesting.

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hotglue stabilizing the 9v battery socket wires.

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pulled the hotglue off, as the 9v connector is no longer necessary.

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I pulled off the wheels to more easily access the chassis, and found that they use a very long 8mm? hex with a standard 1:10 scale M4 wheel nut.

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the steering assembly looked like a normal servo controlled pushrod system

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in order to change the servo, I needed to pull off the front end

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the AWD was provided by a prop shaft. Instead of using a D-cut it instead had a screwdriver-like smashed tip which keyed into the differential input.

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front bumper unscrews and slides off

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took off the shocks and springs, they were preloaded fairly heavily when installed

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getting closer

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inside the bulkhead

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at this point I got excited, since the servo used by Radio Shack was actually very similar in size and layout as our standard hobby servos

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what the servo looks like installed

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what a standard 1:10 servo looks like superimposed

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if the OEM servo had a standard spline then this would've been all too easy

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I decided to install the Traxxas 2075 servo I did the metal gear swap on, so to make the steering assembly work I decided to mount the original servo horn on top of one that fit the TRX spline

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chop chop

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no conflicts here

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I needed to drill a screw hole right here in order for the servo to be able to apply torque to it

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all mounted up

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some quick melt work with my soldering iron and the 2075 fits into the original servo's spot

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one of the main reasons why I decided to use the TRX servo was that the servo horns needed cutting, and from what I can tell the gears strip more readily than anything else on it so I figure if I need it for something else later I can just pick up a new case for cheap

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front end reassembled

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another view. Unfortunately I forgot to feed the servo wire back through the bulkhead like it was originally. oh well.

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that bumper will do a nice job protecting it

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the original pcb was bulky enough to allow me to stuff everything into the compartment. The Duratrax DTX-4 ESC came off of Scott's RC10T3 and the receiver is for my Futaba 3PM FM radio. The heatshrink around the ESC's wires is cause I had to feed the battery connector wires through a tiny hole down into the battery tray. I also salvaged the motor wires from the T3's original motor and soldered it to the wires coming from the motor on the Aftershock. I didn't really feel like taking the rear end apart. Also, one of the nice touches I came up with is to feed the ESC power switch through the hole that was formerly the steering calibration pot.

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bolted back up

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and a breath of life is given to a decade-old RC.

I drove it around for a little bit after finishing, but the gearbox makes a lot of noise so I didn't do any real bashing at 2am. The servo moves pretty slowly so either the TRX servo sucks or the BEC on the ESC is at 5v. (Probably both.)
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