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Dragon Warrior III (DQ3) the GBC remake, not the NES original or SNES version Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 08 December 2007 - 11:31 PM

Name: Dragon Warrior III (original (NES): ドラゴンクエストIII そして伝説へ )
Genre: Classic RPG
Platform: Gameboy Color
Developer: Chunsoft
Publisher: Enix (now Square Enix)
ESRB Rating: T
  • Gameplay: 9/10
    This is a standard, no-bullshit oldskool RPG, which is my absolute favorite genre. Even still, it's interesting to take control of the hero and go on your quest to save the world from the demon lord. However, in MMBN-esque fashion, that isn't the end of the game, and there is another world to explore after you've completed your initial quest.

  • Controls: 9/10
    Controls are the standard Nintendo fare: A is confirm, B is cancel, Dpad is move. It goes a bit further when you're exploring, because A is also used to look around you for items, and B brings up the menu. Once you learn them, they're very handy. Also, the move speed of the character sprites is increased when in towns, which cuts down on travel times in places where it's only big so it'll look realistic.

  • Replay value: 8/10
    Because this is an RPG, you probably won't be replaying this too much...however, the story is SO long (and so good) that I think by the time you've finished the game, you won't remember exactly how the beginning events played out. Either way, the true RPG junkie won't mind, as the quest is very interesting and step by step objectives are varied. It's pretty interesting too, how the events are layed out...the quest starts in a town on an island in what appears to be the south Pacific, if you look at the world map. There is a pyramid and an Egyptian-themed town in what appears to be Africa, and snow up north.

  • Graphics: 10/10
    The character sprites are actually pretty awesome and detailed, considering their pixel resolution. Also, the world map is excellently rendered, and when exploring the world, the time of day visually changes if you're outside long enough (when it's nighttime, and you reenter a town, most people are sleeping and the shops are closed). The monsters follow the tradition of palette swapping, but have unique designs and attack animations. One of the GBC games with the best graphics I've ever seen. Think of it as a GBC version of Golden Sun.

  • Character Development: 10/10
    Don't think it's fair to include this in the criteria, as the characters are simply there for the story. However, if I alter this category just slightly and make it Character Depth instead, it will be able to garner a score. The characters are chosen as a special class, which affects their base stats, basic stat growth, spells/abilities learned, and armor/weapons they can equip. Some classes are all-around type (Hero, Sage) while others specialize in either power (Warrior), magic (Mage) or agility (Thief). On top of this, when you create a character you are able to distribute seeds among their stats, modifying the base stats to your liking (either filling in weak spots, or making strengths stand out more). That's not the only ingredients though, there is also a personality attached to the character, which determines how their stats will grow when they level up. This personality isn't permanent, as it can be either temporarily modified by equipping certain Accessories, or changed to a different one by reading a Special Book (inspiration type books lol, a Sad Book will change the character's personality to Tragic for example). As true in real life, certain personalities are better than others, as a Romantic character will gain stats faster than a Helpless character. This is unique as far as I know, and an excellent system. In fact, for the Hero, you are given a scenario in the beginning of the game that actually chooses the personality to match yours if you are honest in your decisions there. When I first played the game, I couldn't believe it.

  • Storyline: 10/10
    The storyline is excellent, and very thorough (and long!). This is definately up there with the RECENT Final Fantasy games, as the storyline is both interesting, enjoyable, straightforward and sometimes unexpected. After you complete the initial quest, which is a long as other GBC games, there is another world (Alefgard, from the original Dragon Warrior) which you can enter and complete another quest. And, after that, there is a final tower you can go to (sort of like Dread Isle in Golden Sun, and the final summons quest in GS:TLA) upon which is an all-powerful dragon Divinegon (with a shitload of HP, and massively damaging spells). If you beat him, he will grant you a wish (there are four I think, to choose from). This is difficult enough to warrant itself as another quest (you have to be Level 90+ in order to stand a chance).

  • Sounds/Music: 10/10
    The music is top notch (even though it's the GBC MIDI type arrangements). Composed by Sugiyama Koichi, one of the three greats in video game music alongside Uematsu Noboru and Kondo Koji. They've released an orchestrated arrangement of the soundtrack, and it's very impressive.

  • Multiplayer: X/10
    No multiplayer mode

Overall rating: 9.4286/10 (grade score)

This game is one of my all time favorites, the only things it falls short on can't be helped (consider the platform it's on). The story is great, the graphics are vivid, and the battles are interesting (even though you do a lot of grinding). For a comparison, the GBC ROM of this game is 4mb... normal GBC games are 1-2mb, and GBA games, with 32-bit graphics and I think a lot more processor instructions, start at 4mb. This is one of the best games I've ever played, and I enjoyed every minute of it. :3
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