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#1 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 15 April 2007 - 10:20 PM

http://www.livescience.com/technology/0704...w_internet.html

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The idea may seem unthinkable, even absurd, but many believe a “clean slate'' approach is the only way to truly address security, mobility and other challenges that have cropped up since UCLA professor Leonard Kleinrock helped supervise the first exchange of meaningless test data between two machines on Sept. 2, 1969.


No more internet huh? Looks like there are lots of people who think that the internet should be redesigned to provide for needs that weren't apparent when it was invented so many years ago.
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#2 User is offline   Unyo-kun 

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Posted 16 April 2007 - 07:24 PM

its interesting, and it would be nice to have a new interface for networking, especially with the resources we have today. i hope they try to make it a minimal system though, and not bloated w/ features.

lol but i'd like to see them try to implement this. IPv6 can't even seem to be implemented yet, and they are trying to redesign the whole thing. I think if anyone is going to even have a chance at redesigning the internet, 1. theyd have to have LOTS of power. i mean representatives from all the major os companies, major programming languages, hardware designers, etc. who are able to coordinate the changeover 2. it would somehow have to be implemented in increments. sadly thats IPv6's problem, no way to connect IPv4 and v6 together nicely, and IPv4 can't be "upgraded" that well without changing the entire internets at one time.
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#3 User is offline   Bass GS 

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Posted 17 April 2007 - 02:24 PM

whats ipv4 and ipv6 unyo? anyway this looks like it might be scary to try to use. what if it doesn't work and the internet is dow nforever? and there must be some time it takes to set it up when the internet won't work. that might be scary, not being ablt to eonnect to anything.
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#4 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 26 April 2007 - 01:38 AM

I was gonna create a new topic but this will answer bass's question so I'll just stick it in here.

http://www.theage.com.au/news/web/internet...7459749183.html

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A group of researchers led by the University of Tokyo has broken internet speed records - twice in two days.


Interesting stuff, they managed to get super high speeds over normal IPv4 and even higher over IPv6. That's crazy, I can't even get those speeds on an LAN.
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#5 User is offline   Joshua Pack 

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Posted 26 April 2007 - 05:09 PM

HOLLY MOLEY!!!! That is fast! 9gbps!!

well, if you think about it. that is 9giga bits per second. one byte has 8 bits. so that would be 1.135 giga bytes per second. That is still incredible!!! With a LAN Ethernet cord you can reach 100mbps which is like 12.5 megabytes per second, which is good. I do not think an older style computer could be able to even receive at 1.135 giga bytes per second. I do not even think computers they sell today could run that fast in stores! In order to get those speeds you would have to have a super computer to begin with. Unless you could have a router that would hold the data until your computer caught up with it, it would need to be a specialized router.

we have processors that go so many GHz. but is that in bytes or bits or how is that even clocked? and does the whole computer including the motherboard go that fast? is ram able to keep up, how about the hardrive? It could overload or overheat a system :-\ I'm not sure, but I think you would need special equipment to be able to receive it or something :-\
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#6 User is offline   Unyo-kun 

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Posted 26 April 2007 - 09:11 PM

geebuz thats fast. i think they'd need a whole system would need to be customized for that kinda data, like ISP servers or something. i mean, fsb's for generic copper wire motherboards probably can't even keep up with that kind of data. lol @ fiber optic motherboards xD. i hear all they need to change in order to make the internet faster too are just the connectors at the ends, you can't change much when it comes to fiber optic cables (spd of light ftw)
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#7 User is offline   Joshua Pack 

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 02:18 PM

Oh, i am not sure if there is an article on it, i will search after I post, but these scientists were able to make light go faster then the speed of light!!!!

while searching for an article I found one http://www.physorg.com/news5929.html
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#8 User is offline   Bass GS 

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 02:03 PM

I had almost no idea what they were saying in the article but that's pretty neat. i wonder what we can use the new tecnology for. :D it's amazing. what a neat world we all live in :)
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#9 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 02 May 2007 - 04:27 PM

Veji, to answer your question... one ethernet cable is capable of carrying 1Gb/s, that is established. They were most likely using more than one cable, which means they were more than likely using more than one network adapter. the network adapters each have their own PU, which lessens the load on the CPU by taking care of the odds and ends that the CPU doesn't need (I'm guessing like protocol-related stuff, hash checking, etc.).

Also, the CPU clock cycle doesn't mean the amount of information it can concurrently do in one second... a clock cycle is used to perform a machinecode instruction.... certain instructions take more than one clock cycle, but the main point is that GHz != amount of bits CPU can process per second. The reason why high-end business level servers have more than one CPU (and/or cores) is mainly because of the software inside the server (ie. access logging software, making sure protected directories are only accessed by people who have the password, etc.) and keeping track of what everyone wants. As long as these are okay, it can send data at a huge rate.

I'm sure for this, though, they did indeed have specialized hardware because attaining those speeds with normal hardware is impossible due to the higher propogation times of cheaper controllers.

Also, nice find...that article is really interesting. Optics has always interested me, and apparently it's powerful as well.

(From the article)

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This has been done in labs already. a light pulse was sent through a caesium gas chamber that had 3 lasers being pumped through it (1 ot orient spin homogenously, the other two to 'energize' the caesium particles.
normally when light tavels through a medium it has to be absorbed and reemitted to continue along its path. when the light pulse hit this chamber of excited gas, a chain reaction occurs causing all of the caesium in the lights path to instantaneously release its excess energy. observations show the light pulse seemingly exiting the chamber BEFORE it enters it, and the pulse traversed the chamber at about 300C

Since the speed of light is broken in a medium, and not in a vacuum, einstein theories of relativity still stand

This is quite scary actually, I don't quite like the idea of people fiddling around with time and such. I would be lying if I said I was uninterested in these experiments, but I don't see how any good can come from using these findings to mess with the relativity theory.
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#10 User is offline   Joshua Pack 

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 12:47 PM

LOL, yea I never really knew much about CPU, thanks for the info sho.

About the light thing, it is quite amazing. It almost makes you feel nothing is impossible.
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