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#1 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 06 September 2007 - 11:27 PM

This is the general thread for everything you consider amazing going on in the news... I suppose this will be mostly medical/technology related, since breakthroughs in those fields occur all the time.

So, to start off the thread, here's an article worth reading... International Business Machines have managed to store data on an atom. amazing indeed.
http://www.infoworld.com/archives/emailPri...-an-atom_1.html
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#2 User is offline   Bass GS 

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Posted 07 September 2007 - 10:38 AM

wow that is pretty amazing, I wonder how many gb a hard drive willl be able to hold in a few years! especially after they did that, that's aweosme.
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#3 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 11 September 2007 - 07:35 PM

more amazing stuff, an article called 'Seven Wonders of the IT World'
http://www.cio.com/a...le/print/135700
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#4 User is offline   Bass GS 

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Posted 01 October 2007 - 10:55 AM

wow amazing! Google has half a million servers! :wacko: omg I can't even imagine that... and that computer, 65000 processors holy man that's a lot...
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#5 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 11:33 PM

lol yeah. mindboggling statistics in that article.

Here's another one, believable yet kind of startling.

http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20071...c-security.html

People's claims about their installed security software don't quite match up to the real world evidence. Generally just interesting statistics.


Also, some startling news from the same site... UK laws are getting scary.

http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20071...-jail-time.html
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#6 User is offline   Bass GS 

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 09:16 AM

wow. that's interesting though, people have stuff installed that they didn't know. but the second article is scary, poor uk people. that's turning into something bad.
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#7 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 22 November 2007 - 11:48 AM

Internets out of capacity?

http://www.infoworld.com/archives/emailPri...wo-years_1.html

Worth a read, it's interesting...and staggering. I didn't even know it was possible to generate that much data... o_o
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#8 User is offline   Joshua Pack 

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Posted 22 November 2007 - 06:27 PM

WOW. So how much data do you think gets transfered within a year. 1 yottabyte?
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#9 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 30 November 2007 - 08:26 PM

lol this is truly nuckin futs, check this out:
http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20071...infringers.html

The scary thing is that this is more than just a paranoid calculation, this is the truth. This is the reason why DRM doesn't/didn't work, it's because it's so easy to circumvent and people aren't readily aware of the fact that what they're doing is against the law....except DRM is retarded since it hurts the legitimate customer as well.
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#10 User is offline   Joshua Pack 

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 06:06 AM

well, I would not mind a photo of mine being videotaped. more publicity is better. i figure people who copy help spread the word.

There was a time I downloaded some music, and I would then go and buy the cd, if I liked the whole CD I downloaded.

but now that I found out it was wrong, and stopped in the past 5 years, i have not downloaded 1 song our bought 1 song. So you see, because of me trying to legalize myself, it hurt the Music industry. because I dont want to get there CD now, I dont know what kind of lyrics are on there. :-\
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#11 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 09:51 AM

Quote

well, I would not mind a photo of mine being videotaped. more publicity is better. i figure people who copy help spread the word.

That's exactly right, they choose to view the situation as one that is beneficial for them (violaters give them money) but the way I see it, it's just free advertising. 30-second commercials run during the Super Bowl cost millions just for that short airtime, because of the gigantic amount of people watching/exposed to them. P2P-based sharing often has just as many peers (I've seen over 100000 seeds alone for the most popular stuff), and it's usually albums being shared, not just individual songs. Compare the $4 million for 30 seconds to the amount the record label would be paying for 70 minutes...a direct calculation results in a staggering $560 million for a single album, in addition to whatever advertisements they are already running.

Also, more stuff worth reading/checking out...

Ten things holding technology back
http://www.zdnet.co.uk/misc/print/0,100000...9001111c,00.htm
I agree with all of them except #3, if it's not broke don't fix it, after all.

Inside Google
http://blogoscoped.c...-11-28-n25.html
Interesting read, and a peek into all the cool stuff they have inside.
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#12 User is offline   Bass GS 

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 04:03 PM

wow, that's pretty amazing Shonen. I don't know what I'd do if I had to pay that much every year... but thatm eans everyone else has to pay that much too right? how are they going to find enough time and lawyers to sort it all out? it's impossible! :) so we're safe for now.
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#13 User is offline   Joshua Pack 

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 09:26 AM

electronic lawyers. . . out to get you!!!
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#14 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 28 December 2007 - 01:59 AM

Not really news per se, but staggering statistics and helpful instructions/links.
http://www.computerworld.com/action/articl...ticleId=9053959

and a 'wtf is this?' article XD;;;;
http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5hGhJUx...UZ3O5S8f_6VhHww
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#15 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 07:55 PM

First nuckin futs of the new year, this is an amazing laptop by Asustek that can be had for $300!

http://itmanagement....int.php/3719776

that is nuckin futs indeed, and from the looks of it they're trying to make it solid state (no moving parts at all, which means it has a flash-type hdd and no fans required to cool it.
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#16 User is offline   Bass GS 

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 04:11 PM

wow that is amazing, I want one :D
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#17 User is offline   katsu 

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 01:04 AM

pwned. that is all. and to cut it right over the limit, that is a ridiculously cheap laptop. everyone should have one and schools should get those instead of full desktops that suck hard balls.
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#18 User is offline   Bass GS 

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 03:37 PM

wow that is cool, maybe I can save up for a compjuter of my own now. :lol:
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#19 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 07 February 2008 - 02:31 AM

Moar nuckin futs news, this time from the Navy.

http://nextbigfuture.com/2008/02/railgun-o...deployment.html

They're making railguns for use on ships.

On first glance, this looks great. New technology, this is the future of weapons right?

The whole problem of these new, 'high tech' weapons is that they're extremely power hungry, not to mention they have more things to go wrong. It's true that storage and operation will be safer, but this system will be more fragile, and less resistant to damage during a real battle.

To put that kind of energy in perspective, joules can be expressed in more understandable units, like kWH (kilowatt-hours), ft-lbs (foot-pounds of torque), BTU's, calories, etc. A basic conversion is 3600 joules is equal to a watt-hour. A normal, 60W incandescent bulb will consume that much energy in a minute, and a basic PC will consume that much energy in 36 seconds or so. This means that the energy expended from a single shot of the weapon is equivalent of leaving a computer on for just under 30 hours. Now this may not seem like a large amount of energy (joules are actually pretty small measurements for electrical power), but consider the fact that in these units, time is part of the equation. Watts are basically volts * amps, so joules = volts * amps * time (technicalities require that time be in seconds, and all SI prefixes are the same). When you consider the fact that the EMRG only actually consumes power for a fraction of a second, it becomes obvious how high the voltage (and especially current) draw will be. In an age where we've become so obsessed with conservation this, low emissions that, why are we willingly introducing more things that require more energy not just to manufacture (I believe it's more difficult to manufacture an EMRG compared to a traditional, explosive ballistics weapon) but to use as well?

In another perspective (and possibly as a better analogy), a joule is also equal to a foot-pound of torque. That means that the EMRG makes the equivalent of 7848000 ft-lbs of torque.... If you're wondering what that's like, imagine the entire inventory of a Honda Civic dealership (1500+ 8th gen models) stacked up on one side of a four foot long see-saw (two feet between fulcrum and center of weight on each side), and having the shell impact the other side....they will balance. (and as a fun fact, it will take over 56000 of the top-of-the-line Civic's K20 engines to provide a total of that much torque as well.)

Fact is, mechanical energy seems to be more impressive than equivalent electrical energy. It's a good physics exercise calculating equivalent situations and figuring out just how badass having a 10.64 megajoule railgun is....but no matter how I see it, I think we have better things to invest in right now. This is why the government never has money to do good things for the citizens, we're too busy building weapons and sticking our noses in other countries' business.
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#20 User is offline   Joshua Pack 

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 10:46 AM

Talk about AWESOME. . . check this guy out!!!!

http://www.cs.cmu.ed...y/projects/wii/

Look what he is able to do with a wii remote. I am going to start building some projects with some of his ideas, when I finish any of my other projects
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#21 User is offline   Joshua Pack 

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 08:19 AM

do you think this is real?? a perpetual motion machine!!!!!


http://www.g9toengin...monstration.htm

sorry for double post, come on guys post!!!!
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#22 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 03:31 PM

wow, that is amazing indeed. I especially like the whiteboard idea, the ability to have four traces also means you can have a similar setup to the smartboards at UH, which is three colors (black, red, blue) and an 'eraser'.

Edit: that perpetual motion machine looks interesting, tons of big words though :P
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#23 User is offline   Bass GS 

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 03:20 PM

wow, that railgun looks awesome! I wonder when they'll use it first :) nice finds too Vejida, Wiis are getting cooler by the minute. :D
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#24 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 16 February 2008 - 03:45 PM

http://technology.newscientist.com/article...&print=true

I don't know if this qualifies as nuckin futs, but the concept is quite spectacular. Send software updates by means exactly the same as a 'worm' type virus. Smart, no?

To be honest, I don't quite like this idea. This, at best, will provide an unreliable (how do you make sure everyone has it? antiviral programs will no doubt take some time to add these to their whitelists, and/or require an algorithm change to see exactly what the virus does when it executes) patch for software. However, I can see more than a few problems with this approach two of them mentioned above), including the fact that people may pass off malicious worms as software patches (that mcafee 'allow' or 'block' window comes to mind). No doubt some people will be skeptical ('a virus? that doesn't hurt my computer? rubbish') since the computer virus has long been infamous for causing system crashes and frequently requiring victims to reformat.

It's true what they're saying about load-sharing instead of everyone having to download the fix from one server/server cluster, but we already have the technology for that! It's called BitTorrent/P2P! True, the bittorrent protocol has long been seen in a bad light, being related to software/music piracy and sharing of otherwise illegal files....in the same sense of the 'mp3' controversy related to the illegal copying of music. mp3 isn't illegal, it's a file format! That's like saying txt files should be illegal since people use them to store software keys and serial numbers. People usually hear about it being used in a negative manner, and the first impression sticks. Unfortunately, I think this one will not be a good idea, because a worm virus' first impression has been made a long time ago.

Educate people about BitTorrent or other P2P protocols/programs, and the same effect can be achieved. The central server cluster can just issue magnet uri links (Azureus) or other similar type calls, and updates can be downloaded and shared between everyone who has that program. OS companies can even include a transparent BT protocol handler, so that a normal user won't even know that it's torrenting in the background (similar to Windows Update?) and thus won't be alarmed by a worm trying to deposit files on their hdd.

Bottom line of my opinion is: technology for this exists already, why not just make it better and easier for normal users instead of trying to reinvent a known bad one?
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#25 User is offline   Joshua Pack 

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 09:44 AM

That s interesting. Some companies are already use a similar bit-torrent client to download patches for their software. which i think is incredible smart. World Of Warcraft does it. They developed the system to where when you download a patch it is from peer to peer. which is neat. But I am always afraid of that, although I know it checks itself to make sure they code was written correctly. Except how?
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#26 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 19 February 2008 - 01:50 PM

Well, I'm not sure about how you can make sure that the file is official (maybe tracker-side software), but I do like the idea that bittorrent has a built in hashchecking feature. How many times I've installed sensitive things (Apache, for one) and stuff doesn't work because the installer was slightly corrupted.
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#27 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 25 February 2008 - 10:29 PM

Bump on nuckin futs, this one is more economics-related.

http://rapidshare.co...14/drivesfq.rar

There's no real convenient cut and paste catch paragraph, but I promise you that it's an interesting read on how free things on the net are starting to become the norm, and will continue to progress that way until everything is free.
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#28 User is offline   Joshua Pack 

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Posted 26 February 2008 - 08:08 AM

i thought this was neat:

http://www.nokia.com...?newsid=1194251

Quote

Nokia and the University of Cambridge have shown a concept mobile device at the ongoing “Design and the Elastic Mind” exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The concept device, dubbed “the morph”, which would be built using nanotechnology, could define the mobile device of the future if Nokia manages to turn it into reality some day.

Nokia and UC hope to create devices that are strechable, flexible and bendable. This would allow users to transform the device into another shape, which can also then performs another function.

The morph concept is based on the unexplored functionality of nanotechnology. Nokia and UC researchers believe that nanotechnology is capable of delivering flexible materials, transparent electronics and self-cleaning surfaces. All the qualities that the joint team would try to implement in the Morph concept device.

Dr. Tapani Ryhanen, Head of the NRC Cambridge UK laboratory said that the combination of art and science through Nokia and UC’s collaboration will showcase the true potential of nanotechnology to a wider audience.

“The research we are carrying out is fundamental to this as we seek a safe and controlled way to develop and use new materials,” says Ryhanen.

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#29 User is offline   Bass GS 

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Posted 29 February 2008 - 02:51 PM

View PostShonen, on Feb 25 2008, 10:29 PM, said:

Bump on nuckin futs, this one is more economics-related.

http://rapidshare.co...14/drivesfq.rar

There's no real convenient cut and paste catch paragraph, but I promise you that it's an interesting read on how free things on the net are starting to become the norm, and will continue to progress that way until everything is free.

what shonen? that's a rapidshare link :lol: fix your post!
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#30 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 20 March 2008 - 04:56 PM

Oh snap, you're right xD here's the correct link: http://www.wired.com/techbiz/it/magazine/1...currentPage=all
Sorry about that, it's worth a read. Especially if you're thinking of majoring in business or economics (or already are).


In other news, there is some progress (and rays of hope) in the room-temperature semiconductor field of science! Very interesting, although it does require explosives and a rediculous amount of pressure (gigapascals).
http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20080...ith-silane.html
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