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#1 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 21 February 2008 - 12:00 AM

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Research carried out by the NCC found that EULAs (end-user licensing agreements) were badly-worded, typically exonerating software companies from any legal responsibility for their products, and left buyers with "less protection than when they buy a cheap biro."

The NCC said it will now refer the 17 worst offenders—including Microsoft, Apple, Symantec, Kaspersky, and McAfee—to the U.K.'s Office of Fair Trading (OFT) for investigation.

http://www.cio.com/a...le/print/185903

This is something that affects all of us, because I'm pretty sure all of us download and use software on a regular basis. The EULA is something you have to agree to in order for it to install, and I too have noticed that these things were getting longer and longer....among other things. Take a look into any EULA for popular free software (especially ones that are highly important, like antivirus or computer scanning software and the license pretty much tells you these things:

1. you have to read it in order for it to install (the only time I've ever read an entire EULA was the very first time I've ever installed software in my life)
2. the company that you got (and sometimes, bought) the program from will take no responsibility if they suck and the program crashes your computer, deletes all your valuable data, and ruins your life forever
3. even if something is caused by negligent programming on the company's part, you can't file lawsuits against them
4. reverse engineering the software (read: making keygens, finding serials, etc) is against the law (HAHAHAHAHAHAH!)
5. otherwise, anything else bad that happens is your fault, and everything good is because the company is so awesome.

I'd been getting annoyed by this, it's like putting up a disclaimer on the side of an airline that 'if we crash cause our wings break off don't blame us'... why are people so afraid of taking responsibility nowadays?
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#2 User is offline   Joshua Pack 

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Posted 22 February 2008 - 06:17 AM

Well, i agree with all of that as long as you didn't have to pay for the program.

If you bought the program, you should be able to sue them. because you paid 100's of dollars for a program, and it crashed your computer losing all your valuable data.

If your paying for it, it should come with some type of liability from the programmers.
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#3 User is offline   aotsukisho 

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Posted 22 February 2008 - 10:54 AM

Yeah that is true, free programs are exempt from this, for obvious reasons. I've just seen way too many paying stuff (particularly OS-related software updates) have stupid EULAs that piss me off for the blatant lack of responsibility.

If my computer crashes or I lose data because I was using software I bought, I should have a right to sue the company no matter what they say, if it happened due to a fault or oversight in their code and not my mistake.
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#4 User is offline   Bass GS 

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Posted 22 February 2008 - 03:00 PM

hmm, I tried to read them but they're so boring and confusing. I guess that's why they wrote this article.
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#5 User is offline   Joshua Pack 

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Posted 23 February 2008 - 08:09 AM

i wanna know the 17 offenders
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