Digital.Complex: Government study proves illegal file sharing increases music sales - Digital.Complex

Jump to content

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Government study proves illegal file sharing increases music sales Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   Joshua Pack 

  • Regular Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • View blog
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 246
  • Joined: 18-October 05

Posted 03 November 2007 - 11:19 AM

I thought this was pretty neat.

Quote

A government study has proved what many of us have suspected for a long time, that illegal file sharing actually increases the number of CDs sold rather than reduces it.

The study was commissioned by Industry Canada, a ministry of the Canadian federal government.

It is called 'The Impact of Music Downloads and P2P File-Sharing on the Purchase of Music: A Study for Industry Canada', and was written by Birgitte Andersen and Marion Frenz, of the Department of Management at the University of London in England.

The pair surveyed over 2,000 Canadians on their music downloading and purchasing habits, and the results will be uncomfortable reading for the CRIA (Canadian Recording Industry Association) and the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) both of which have repeatedly denied the positive connections between downloads and physical purchases.

The most striking conclusion of the survey is that P2P file sharing does not actively harm the music industry in terms of sales, and in fact the opposite is true: It increases music sales.

The study claims that for every 12 P2P downloads, or one album, music purchasing increases by 0.44 CDs per year. Furthermore, about half of all P2P tracks are downloaded because individuals want to hear songs before buying them, not as copies intended to replace the need for making a purchase in the first place.

So it seems that the claims of recording industry organisations around the world as to how damaging illegal downloads are to their business are either plain wrong or at least being exaggerated.

Obviously industry lobbyists will be very quick to jump in to the debate and dismiss the study as insubstantial or inaccurate, but when a study by a government ministry tells them they are wrong, where are they going to take the argument next?


This was found at:
http://tech.blorge.com/Structure:%20/2007/...es-music-sales/
0

#2 User is offline   aotsukisho 

  • D.C Administrator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • View blog
  • Group: Owner
  • Posts: 2,521
  • Joined: 18-October 05

Posted 03 November 2007 - 07:17 PM

I thought so, actually, because that's what I do. <_< >_>

Also, I tend to download movie rips of copyprotected movies that I own and iso's of games I have, simply because I can't be bothered to check codec settings and spend the processing power to convert them.

Don't know what everyone's problem is with copyright protection and crap, DRM is already a nice example of how ghey they will make life for 'legit' purchased copies owned by people, and how easily it is circumvented.
0

#3 User is offline   Bass GS 

  • ??
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 673
  • Joined: 06-December 05

Posted 05 November 2007 - 03:01 PM

haha that means the ost section is a huge help to the music industry then, right shonen? THat's good news!
0

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users